A Step by step video guide on how to complete your annual research plan is now available

If you weren’t able to make it to one of our Annual Research Plan (ARP) workshops at the start of February, fear not! The RADAR team have made a step by step video guide to help you complete your ARP.

The video covers how to find and use the ARP template in RADAR and highlights new fields that have been added this year. It also shows you how to export your plan into a word doc. (or similar) and how to use a previously submitted ARP as a template for this year’s plan.

The video can be accessed here:

http://radar.gsa.ac.uk/5067/

We hope the video will be of use to those who completed an ARP last year and for those who are completing one for the first time.

We’re always happy to help!

If you have any queries about the content of your ARP or the review process please contact Julie Ramage (j.ramage@gsa.ac.uk), or if you have any queries about the ARP template in RADAR please contact the RADAR team (radar@gsa.ac.uk).

 

Dawn Pike,

Research Information Coordinator

February 2016

“I’m not a scientist, I don’t have any research data!” – capturing and preserving arts and humanities research

Aptly enough on this year’s St Andrew’s Day, Julie Ramage, Dawn Pike and Nicola Siminson made their way to the University of St Andrews, for a Jisc Research Data Network meeting.   The RDN aims to offer participants a place to discuss current issues relating to research data in institutions, and to demonstrate practical research data management implementations.

But what is research data management in the arts and humanities?  That was one of the reasons for our trip to St Andrews – to raise awareness of this question (and the difficulties in answering it!) by running a workshop and hosting an exchange of experiences and tips amongst our colleagues from institutions such as Gray’s School of Art at Robert Gordon University, the Universities of Edinburgh, Leeds, Lincoln and Nottingham, and the University of the Creative Arts.  Jeremy Barraud, Deputy Director for Research Management and Administration at the University of the Arts London (UAL), collaborated with us on the development of the workshop and the presentation we gave, and shared insights into UAL’s RDM activities – including their data repository (http://researchdata.arts.ac.uk), and their Community of Practice for research staff.

We presented some of the knottier issues around recognising “research data” in practice-based outputs by way of some role play, with Julie and Nicola enacting a conversation between a researcher and a data manager about the researcher’s exhibition output – based on questions such as:

  • What type of research data did you create?
  • Where do you keep and store your research data – both during and after the research project? Is it shareable with others?
  • How do you decide what to keep, and for how long?
  • What aspects of your research, and your research data, do you want others to be able to access in 10 years’ time?

Whilst the GSA’s Research Data Management Policy attempts a definition of research data, this is trickier to define than in STEM subjects, especially as “data” in the arts and humanities can comprise highly diverse content and formats (for example, we showed an image of the VHS tapes that contained research data for the UAL’s Rococo Project).  The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) expects the bids it receives to include a “technical plan”, which sets out how any digital outputs – such as research data – are going to be delivered and preserved.  But researchers can benefit on a personal level from managing and preserving their data, which will enable them to build on their research throughout their careers.

The ideas shared at the workshop for making “research data” more meaningful in the arts and humanities included:

  • mindmapping research projects and their data (created over a number of years), and presenting this more visually as a storyboard
  • using services such as Vimeo or YouTube alongside the institutional repository to make recordings of performances available, using lower resolution files for the former, and drawing on the capacity of the latter to store higher resolution files
  • utilising open source software such as Omeka (https://omeka.org/) to capture research data as you go along
  • building people profiles and case studies around RDM practices in the arts and humanities
  • working with postgraduate / early career researchers to develop their RDM skills

You can find out more about the support available for GSA researchers as follows:

 

Nicola Siminson
Institutional Repository and Records Manager
The Glasgow School of Art

December 2016

What images can I share on RADAR?

Uploading images to RADAR is a great way to showcase your work – particularly if the record is describing a practice based output such as an exhibition or an artefact. If you have ever wondered exactly what images you can make openly available on RADAR then hopefully this blog will help.

So, what kinds of images can you upload to RADAR?

You can upload, for example: images of your drawings and paintings or photos of your exhibitions and artefacts – basically if it helps potential users understand the work you are describing feel free to add it to RADAR.  We do, however, prefer original images are added to the repository – so it’s best not to add scans of book sections or front covers of publications because publishers rarely allow us to make them publicly available.

The GSA preference is for images to be uploaded as JPEGs but RADAR can handle a wide range of formats including TIFF, PNG or BMP.

You should also consider who owns the copyright of the images before you upload them.

If you own the copyright of the images you want to upload you can make them available without any restrictions, however, you may want to add Creative Commons licenses to the images so users of your work know what they can and cannot do with them. You can read more about creative commons licenses in our blog post ‘Creative commons licenses explained.’

What do you do if you don’t own the copyright?

If you do not own the copyright of the image you wish to upload to RADAR you will need to identify who owns the copyright and seek their permission to use it. It’s important to note that the © symbol does not need to be displayed on an image for it to exist. For example, if an image you want to upload has already been used on the GSA website this doesn’t mean it is in the public domain and can be freely re-used.

A good place to find creative commons images that you can re-use in your work and upload to places like RADAR is the creative commons site:

https://search.creativecommons.org/

Their search function connects you to many reliable sources of CC licensed material which you can use in your work without infringing copyright.

We should also mention that uploading images to RADAR means they will appear in our carousel!

radar-image-carousel

Once you have added images to RADAR they will appear in the RADAR image carousel which randomly selects and displays different images from RADAR on the homepage – so keep an eye out for your images the next time you’re using RADAR!

If you have any queries about adding images to RADAR please don’t hesitate to get in touch by emailing us at radar@gsa.ac.uk and don’t forget to subscribe to our blog by adding your email address to the ‘follow our blog via email’ option on the menu on the right.

Open Access Monographs – more questions than answers?

The last of our OA Week 2016 blogs is a brief look into the topic of Open Access Monographs.

This is quite a contentious issue and there are currently a number of projects looking into how monographs can be made open access.  Many of the questions surrounding OA monographs are concerned with how the monograph form will be preserved in an OA model and how an open access monograph business model will be viable?

What is evident from the research being undertaken is that it will not be a similar process to how we make an article or conference paper OA, and therefore will need to be approached in a different manner. As Geoffrey Crossick notes in his report to HEFCE on Monographs and Open Access:

“It is very clear, however, that extending open access to books is not easy. From licensing and copyright to business models and quality, the issues that must be tackled are thorny and numerous [however] Open access can solve important issues about accessibility, it can enhance the ways in which we publish, use and interact with books, and has the potential to revitalise the academic community’s connection with the peer review, publication and dissemination of books” (Crossick, 2015, p.4).

Some publishers and academic presses are currently testing new business models which will enable researchers  to publish their monographs open access, however, it is currently very expensive to do! Edinburgh University Press are currently quoting a £10,000 APC to make a monograph OA and this only applies to authored research monographs – so edited books and critical editions are not covered.

See: https://edinburghuniversitypress.com/information/publish-with-us/open-access

Another alternative model has been suggested by a consortium called ‘Knowledge Unlatched’ which is made up of member libraries who pay the costs of making scholarly monographs open access. If you’re interested to learn more there’s a lot of useful information on their website: http://www.knowledgeunlatched.org/

There are many differing opinions and ideas surrounding how we could transition into open access monograph publishing but for the moment it does seem to be an area where there are more questions than answers.

If you would like an in depth introduction to open access monographs you should check out Goldsmiths Panel Discussion “Open Access Monographs and Publishing Models: Collaborative Ways Forward”, which discusses how OA monographs could be managed and how it may support or disadvantage their particular professional sector and ethical goals:


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/145993443″>Open Access Monographs and Publishing Models: Collaborative Ways Forward</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/goldsmiths”>Goldsmiths, University of London</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Let us know what you think!

Creative commons licenses explained

The second of our Open Access Week 2016 blogs will focus on creative commons licenses and how they can help you share your work.

Research has shown that one of the main factors that prevent researchers and practitioners from depositing their work in an institutional repository is fears over copyright infringement (Creaser, 2010 p. 57). In our previous blog we showed you how to make your manuscripts openly available via the “green” open access route by using the Sherpa/Romeo tool to ensure you don’t infringe the copyright policy of the publisher.

But you may be wondering, how can you protect your own work when you share it online and ensure you get the attribution you deserve? The answer is – use a creative commons license!

So, what is creative commons?

 Creative Commons is a global non-profit organization dedicated to supporting the creation of a global digital commons. Creative commons seek to achieve this by opening up access to knowledge and creative works which can then be used by the public for free.

Whenever you create a new artwork, take a photo or write an article it is automatically considered “all rights reserved” in the eyes of copyright law. This means that others cannot re-use or remix your work without seeking permission first. But, if you want others to be able to re-use your work you can use a creative commons license to help you do this.

Creative commons licenses do not replace copyright!

 Creative Commons licenses are not an alternative to copyright but work in partnership with copyright laws and licensing. By default, copyright law allows only limited reuses without your permission. CC licenses lets you grant additional permissions to the public, allowing reuse on the terms best suited to your needs while reserving some rights for yourself.

When you add a CC license to your work you can decide which rights you’d like to keep, the license then clearly conveys to those using your work how they’re permitted to use it without having to ask you in advance. So it works positively for both the creator and user!

What licenses are available?

 Each license can contain a mixture of the following features.

attribution

Attribution:  All CC licenses require that others who use your work must give you credit.

sharealike

ShareAlike:  This feature means that you will let others copy, distribute, display, perform, and modify your work, as long as they distribute any modified work on the same terms.

noncommercial

NoDerivatives: This feature means that you let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only original copies of your work.  If they want to modify your work, they must get your permission first.

noncommercial

NonCommercial: This feature means that you let others copy, distribute, display, perform, and (unless you have chosen NoDerivatives) modify and use your work for any purpose other than commercially unless they get your permission first.

 

Based on the features that you have chosen from the options above, you will then get a license that clearly indicates how other people may use your creative work.

The license options are shown in this handy info-graphic:

cc-licenses-infographic

How do I add a CC license to my work in RADAR?

 You can easily add a CC license to your work when you are uploading to RADAR. As you can see from the screenshot below, when you are in the ‘upload’ tab in RADAR and you have selected the item you would like to upload and make available you will see a ‘license’ option. Here you can open a drop down box by clicking on it and selecting the license that most suits your needs:

adding-cc-licenses-in-radar

You can also use CC licensed material in your own work!

 The wide adoption of CC licenses has enabled the creation of a globally accessible pool of resources that includes the work of artists, educators, scientists, and governments. To encourage re-use of this material the creative commons site lists many reliable sources of CC licensed material you can use in your work without infringing copyright, see:

https://search.creativecommons.org/

If you would like more information about creative commons you can visit their website, which is full of useful information on their work and the licenses:

https://creativecommons.org/

 And don’t forget the RADAR team are always happy to provide help with queries on copyright and creative commons. So please don’t hesitate to get in touch by emailing us at radar@gsa.ac.uk

———————

Credits:

 Creaser, Claire, 2010. “Open Access to Research Outputs—Institutional Policies and Researchers’ Views: Results from Two Complementary Surveys.”  New Review of Academic Librarianship 16.1 pp. 4–25.

“Creative commons” logo and license images are licensed under CC BY 4.0 © Creative Commons

Gold and Green Open Access Explained

The first in our series of OA Week 2016 blogs will explain the difference between the two different types of open access and hopefully dispel some of the myths around them.

It’s important to note that open access does not mean papers are not peer reviewed. In both open access models, papers undergo the same rigorous peer-review processes as in traditional academic publishing, and most academic journals have now developed OA routes for their authors.

Within open access there are two main options:

  1. Green open access
  2. Gold open access

Green open access:

Green open access is a free model; authors do not need to pay to make their paper openly accessible.

Making your paper available via the green route involves depositing a version of your paper in an institutional repository such as GSA’s RADAR.  Publishers often stipulate the paper must be embargoed for a fixed period before the paper can be made publicly available. Embargo periods may differ in length from 6 – 36 months and vary in subject fields.

What version of your paper can you make available under Green OA?

The version of the paper you can archive varies according to the publisher’s archiving policy but most major publishers usually allow you to make the ‘accepted’ version of your paper available.

The accepted version, or “post print” as it sometimes referred to, is the author-created version that has been updated to include all changes resulting from peer review, as well as any changes of an academic nature requested by the journal editor or conference organiser.

The accepted manuscript is not the same as the copy-edited, typeset or published paper – these versions are known as ‘proofs’ or ‘versions of record’, and publishers do not normally allow authors to make these openly accessible.

Why should I make my paper available through green open access?

Self-archiving your papers in RADAR will increase their availability and discoverability and removes the need to pay open access charges. It should also be noted that the GSA’s Institutional preference is for Green OA via our institutional repository, RADAR.

More information on the GSA’S Open Access policy can be found here:  http://www.gsa.ac.uk/media/1293340/gsa-open-access-policy-v13-15_09_24.pdf

Gold open access:

Gold OA  involves authors publishing in open-access journals that do not receive income through reader subscriptions. Publishing in an open access journal may therefore require an article processing charge (APC) to be paid.

What version of your paper can you archive under Gold Open Access?

The Gold option allows you to archive the final published version in an institutional or subject repository without an embargo. This means that as soon as it’s published its openly available to anyone and not kept behind a pay wall.

So, how do you find out what your open access options are?

To find out your open access options you can check publisher policies and embargo periods on the Sherpa/Romeo  service by searching the name of the journal, publisher or ISSN.

sherpa-for-blog

In this example I have searched for the open access policy of the journal ‘Northern Scotland’. From the screenshot above we can see the publisher allows green open access and the author accepted version (post refereeing) can be made available on the repository without an embargo. It is worth noting, however, that this is quite a liberal policy – most major publishers such as Elsevier and Taylor and Francis usually stipulate embargo’s between 12 -24 months for green open access. So it is always best practice to check their policy on Sherpa/Romeo before uploading your paper to RADAR!

The RADAR team are here to help!

Don’t forget the RADAR team are always happy to provide information on open access and publisher policies. If you are interested in making your research open access but don’t know where to start please don’t hesitate to get in touch by emailing us at radar@gsa.ac.uk

A brief look ahead to Open Access Week 2016

 

The 24-30 October 2016 is International Open Access Week – if you’re not exactly sure what that is then let us enlighten you!

 Put simply, Open Access (OA) is online access to research outputs, which are free for anyone to view, read and download, without the need to log in or make a payment. Where possible, Open Access materials should be free of most copyright restrictions.

International Open Access Week is a global event that has been created to celebrate and promote open access and its benefits. OA week events encourage the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access and to share what they’ve learned with colleagues who may not have heard of OA.

Each Open Access week has a theme and this year it is “Open in Action” which is all about taking steps to open up research and encouraging others to do the same.

So, what are we doing?

 The RADAR team has decided to do a series of blogs next week that explain various ways you can open up your research outputs. There will be blogs explaining the different types of open access known as “green” and “gold”, a look into Creative Commons licenses and how they can help you make your outputs open access, and a look into Open Access monographs.

In the meantime if you would like to find out more about Open Access why not check out our blog “The Benefits of Open Access” or watch this great video “Open Access Explained”:

See you all on Open Access Week!