What images can I share on RADAR?

Uploading images to RADAR is a great way to showcase your work – particularly if the record is describing a practice based output such as an exhibition or an artefact. If you have ever wondered exactly what images you can make openly available on RADAR then hopefully this blog will help.

So, what kinds of images can you upload to RADAR?

You can upload, for example: images of your drawings and paintings or photos of your exhibitions and artefacts – basically if it helps potential users understand the work you are describing feel free to add it to RADAR.  We do, however, prefer original images are added to the repository – so it’s best not to add scans of book sections or front covers of publications because publishers rarely allow us to make them publicly available.

The GSA preference is for images to be uploaded as JPEGs but RADAR can handle a wide range of formats including TIFF, PNG or BMP.

You should also consider who owns the copyright of the images before you upload them.

If you own the copyright of the images you want to upload you can make them available without any restrictions, however, you may want to add Creative Commons licenses to the images so users of your work know what they can and cannot do with them. You can read more about creative commons licenses in our blog post ‘Creative commons licenses explained.’

What do you do if you don’t own the copyright?

If you do not own the copyright of the image you wish to upload to RADAR you will need to identify who owns the copyright and seek their permission to use it. It’s important to note that the © symbol does not need to be displayed on an image for it to exist. For example, if an image you want to upload has already been used on the GSA website this doesn’t mean it is in the public domain and can be freely re-used.

A good place to find creative commons images that you can re-use in your work and upload to places like RADAR is the creative commons site:

https://search.creativecommons.org/

Their search function connects you to many reliable sources of CC licensed material which you can use in your work without infringing copyright.

We should also mention that uploading images to RADAR means they will appear in our carousel!

radar-image-carousel

Once you have added images to RADAR they will appear in the RADAR image carousel which randomly selects and displays different images from RADAR on the homepage – so keep an eye out for your images the next time you’re using RADAR!

If you have any queries about adding images to RADAR please don’t hesitate to get in touch by emailing us at radar@gsa.ac.uk and don’t forget to subscribe to our blog by adding your email address to the ‘follow our blog via email’ option on the menu on the right.

Open Access Monographs – more questions than answers?

The last of our OA Week 2016 blogs is a brief look into the topic of Open Access Monographs.

This is quite a contentious issue and there are currently a number of projects looking into how monographs can be made open access.  Many of the questions surrounding OA monographs are concerned with how the monograph form will be preserved in an OA model and how an open access monograph business model will be viable?

What is evident from the research being undertaken is that it will not be a similar process to how we make an article or conference paper OA, and therefore will need to be approached in a different manner. As Geoffrey Crossick notes in his report to HEFCE on Monographs and Open Access:

“It is very clear, however, that extending open access to books is not easy. From licensing and copyright to business models and quality, the issues that must be tackled are thorny and numerous [however] Open access can solve important issues about accessibility, it can enhance the ways in which we publish, use and interact with books, and has the potential to revitalise the academic community’s connection with the peer review, publication and dissemination of books” (Crossick, 2015, p.4).

Some publishers and academic presses are currently testing new business models which will enable researchers  to publish their monographs open access, however, it is currently very expensive to do! Edinburgh University Press are currently quoting a £10,000 APC to make a monograph OA and this only applies to authored research monographs – so edited books and critical editions are not covered.

See: https://edinburghuniversitypress.com/information/publish-with-us/open-access

Another alternative model has been suggested by a consortium called ‘Knowledge Unlatched’ which is made up of member libraries who pay the costs of making scholarly monographs open access. If you’re interested to learn more there’s a lot of useful information on their website: http://www.knowledgeunlatched.org/

There are many differing opinions and ideas surrounding how we could transition into open access monograph publishing but for the moment it does seem to be an area where there are more questions than answers.

If you would like an in depth introduction to open access monographs you should check out Goldsmiths Panel Discussion “Open Access Monographs and Publishing Models: Collaborative Ways Forward”, which discusses how OA monographs could be managed and how it may support or disadvantage their particular professional sector and ethical goals:


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/145993443″>Open Access Monographs and Publishing Models: Collaborative Ways Forward</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/goldsmiths”>Goldsmiths, University of London</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Let us know what you think!

Creative commons licenses explained

cc-commons

The second of our Open Access Week 2016 blogs will focus on creative commons licenses and how they can help you share your work.

Research has shown that one of the main factors that prevent researchers and practitioners from depositing their work in an institutional repository is fears over copyright infringement (Creaser, 2010 p. 57). In our previous blog we showed you how to make your manuscripts openly available via the “green” open access route by using the Sherpa/Romeo tool to ensure you don’t infringe the copyright policy of the publisher.

But you may be wondering, how can you protect your own work when you share it online and ensure you get the attribution you deserve? The answer is – use a creative commons license!

So, what is creative commons?

 Creative Commons is a global non-profit organization dedicated to supporting the creation of a global digital commons. Creative commons seek to achieve this by opening up access to knowledge and creative works which can then be used by the public for free.

Whenever you create a new artwork, take a photo or write an article it is automatically considered “all rights reserved” in the eyes of copyright law. This means that others cannot re-use or remix your work without seeking permission first. But, if you want others to be able to re-use your work you can use a creative commons license to help you do this.

Creative commons licenses do not replace copyright!

 Creative Commons licenses are not an alternative to copyright but work in partnership with copyright laws and licensing. By default, copyright law allows only limited reuses without your permission. CC licenses lets you grant additional permissions to the public, allowing reuse on the terms best suited to your needs while reserving some rights for yourself.

When you add a CC license to your work you can decide which rights you’d like to keep, the license then clearly conveys to those using your work how they’re permitted to use it without having to ask you in advance. So it works positively for both the creator and user!

What licenses are available?

 Each license can contain a mixture of the following features.

attribution

Attribution:  All CC licenses require that others who use your work must give you credit.

sharealike

ShareAlike:  This feature means that you will let others copy, distribute, display, perform, and modify your work, as long as they distribute any modified work on the same terms.

noncommercial

NoDerivatives: This feature means that you let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only original copies of your work.  If they want to modify your work, they must get your permission first.

noncommercial

NonCommercial: This feature means that you let others copy, distribute, display, perform, and (unless you have chosen NoDerivatives) modify and use your work for any purpose other than commercially unless they get your permission first.

 

Based on the features that you have chosen from the options above, you will then get a license that clearly indicates how other people may use your creative work.

The license options are shown in this handy info-graphic:

cc-licenses-infographic

How do I add a CC license to my work in RADAR?

 You can easily add a CC license to your work when you are uploading to RADAR. As you can see from the screenshot below, when you are in the ‘upload’ tab in RADAR and you have selected the item you would like to upload and make available you will see a ‘license’ option. Here you can open a drop down box by clicking on it and selecting the license that most suits your needs:

adding-cc-licenses-in-radar

You can also use CC licensed material in your own work!

 The wide adoption of CC licenses has enabled the creation of a globally accessible pool of resources that includes the work of artists, educators, scientists, and governments. To encourage re-use of this material the creative commons site lists many reliable sources of CC licensed material you can use in your work without infringing copyright, see:

https://search.creativecommons.org/

If you would like more information about creative commons you can visit their website, which is full of useful information on their work and the licenses:

https://creativecommons.org/

 And don’t forget the RADAR team are always happy to provide help with queries on copyright and creative commons. So please don’t hesitate to get in touch by emailing us at radar@gsa.ac.uk

———————

Credits:

 Creaser, Claire, 2010. “Open Access to Research Outputs—Institutional Policies and Researchers’ Views: Results from Two Complementary Surveys.”  New Review of Academic Librarianship 16.1 pp. 4–25.

“Creative commons” logo and license images are licensed under CC BY 4.0 © Creative Commons

Gold and Green Open Access Explained

gold-and-green

The first in our series of OA Week 2016 blogs will explain the difference between the two different types of open access and hopefully dispel some of the myths around them.

It’s important to note that open access does not mean papers are not peer reviewed. In both open access models, papers undergo the same rigorous peer-review processes as in traditional academic publishing, and most academic journals have now developed OA routes for their authors.

Within open access there are two main options:

  1. Green open access
  2. Gold open access

Green open access:

Green open access is a free model; authors do not need to pay to make their paper openly accessible.

Making your paper available via the green route involves depositing a version of your paper in an institutional repository such as GSA’s RADAR.  Publishers often stipulate the paper must be embargoed for a fixed period before the paper can be made publicly available. Embargo periods may differ in length from 6 – 36 months and vary in subject fields.

What version of your paper can you make available under Green OA?

The version of the paper you can archive varies according to the publisher’s archiving policy but most major publishers usually allow you to make the ‘accepted’ version of your paper available.

The accepted version, or “post print” as it sometimes referred to, is the author-created version that has been updated to include all changes resulting from peer review, as well as any changes of an academic nature requested by the journal editor or conference organiser.

The accepted manuscript is not the same as the copy-edited, typeset or published paper – these versions are known as ‘proofs’ or ‘versions of record’, and publishers do not normally allow authors to make these openly accessible.

Why should I make my paper available through green open access?

Self-archiving your papers in RADAR will increase their availability and discoverability and removes the need to pay open access charges. It should also be noted that the GSA’s Institutional preference is for Green OA via our institutional repository, RADAR.

More information on the GSA’S Open Access policy can be found here:  http://www.gsa.ac.uk/media/1293340/gsa-open-access-policy-v13-15_09_24.pdf

Gold open access:

Gold OA  involves authors publishing in open-access journals that do not receive income through reader subscriptions. Publishing in an open access journal may therefore require an article processing charge (APC) to be paid.

What version of your paper can you archive under Gold Open Access?

The Gold option allows you to archive the final published version in an institutional or subject repository without an embargo. This means that as soon as it’s published its openly available to anyone and not kept behind a pay wall.

So, how do you find out what your open access options are?

To find out your open access options you can check publisher policies and embargo periods on the Sherpa/Romeo  service by searching the name of the journal, publisher or ISSN.

sherpa-for-blog

In this example I have searched for the open access policy of the journal ‘Northern Scotland’. From the screenshot above we can see the publisher allows green open access and the author accepted version (post refereeing) can be made available on the repository without an embargo. It is worth noting, however, that this is quite a liberal policy – most major publishers such as Elsevier and Taylor and Francis usually stipulate embargo’s between 12 -24 months for green open access. So it is always best practice to check their policy on Sherpa/Romeo before uploading your paper to RADAR!

The RADAR team are here to help!

Don’t forget the RADAR team are always happy to provide information on open access and publisher policies. If you are interested in making your research open access but don’t know where to start please don’t hesitate to get in touch by emailing us at radar@gsa.ac.uk

A brief look ahead to Open Access Week 2016

oa-week

 

The 24-30 October 2016 is International Open Access Week – if you’re not exactly sure what that is then let us enlighten you!

 Put simply, Open Access (OA) is online access to research outputs, which are free for anyone to view, read and download, without the need to log in or make a payment. Where possible, Open Access materials should be free of most copyright restrictions.

International Open Access Week is a global event that has been created to celebrate and promote open access and its benefits. OA week events encourage the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access and to share what they’ve learned with colleagues who may not have heard of OA.

Each Open Access week has a theme and this year it is “Open in Action” which is all about taking steps to open up research and encouraging others to do the same.

So, what are we doing?

 The RADAR team has decided to do a series of blogs next week that explain various ways you can open up your research outputs. There will be blogs explaining the different types of open access known as “green” and “gold”, a look into Creative Commons licenses and how they can help you make your outputs open access, and a look into Open Access monographs.

In the meantime if you would like to find out more about Open Access why not check out our blog “The Benefits of Open Access” or watch this great video “Open Access Explained”:

See you all on Open Access Week!

A new home for RADAR, Open Access and RDM guides and information

Over the summer the RADAR team have been busy updating the Research and Knowledge Exchange section of the GSA’s VLE with a range of information about RADAR, Open Access (OA) and Research Data Management (RDM).

To access these new sections, GSA staff can log on to https://vle.gsa.ac.uk/  and then select the Research & Knowledge Exchange community, which should be listed on the right of the homepage. In the image below you can see the three new sections we’ve added.

 

new-vle-jpg

Update your bookmarks, favourites, reading lists …

 A lot of the information that is now on the VLE used to be housed on the GSA Library webpages, but the RADAR FAQs, along with pages explaining Open Access and Research Data Management, have now been migrated to the VLE – so if you’ve bookmarked any of these web pages, please update them to the VLE.

The GSA Open Access and RDM policies can now be found in their respective VLE sections, and are also accessible from the Institutional Policies section of the GSA website, at the following link:  http://www.gsa.ac.uk/about-gsa/key-information/institutional-policies/

What’s new?      

The new sections of the VLE have enabled us to update our information and advice on RADAR, Open Access and Research Data Management, and we really hope you find it useful!

The RADAR section now brings together all the “How to…” guides you need to become a RADAR pro – they can be found under the ‘About RADAR’ section.   

We have a few new guides that you also might like to check out:

  • The ‘Adding dates to RADAR deposits’ guide explains why RADAR has now started prompting you for an ‘accepted date’ for conference papers and articles, and shows what information you need to supply, and why.
  • We also have a quick guide on ‘How to add a profile picture to RADAR’, which is a nice way to brighten up and personalise your RADAR profile page.

We have also added links to ‘Useful Resources’ that can help you make your work Open Access, and manage your research data – these can be found in the ‘What is Open Access?’  and ‘Research Data Management’ sections.

The RADAR Team are here to help!

The RADAR team hope these new sections on the VLE will provide you with useful information and tips on RADAR, OA and RDM, whenever you need it – but rest assured that the RADAR team are available to provide support and a friendly face if you need further information or assistance.

Dawn Pike, Research Information Co-ordinator

September 2016

The Benefits of Open Access

oa symbol

 

Following on from last month’s blog about RADAR’s open access download statistics we thought we would look further into the benefits of open access for GSA researchers.

Firstly, you may be wondering what exactly is ‘open access’?

Put simply, Open Access (OA) is online access to research outputs, which are free for anyone to view, read, download and reuse without the need to log in or make a payment.

Many researchers attach creative commons licenses to the outputs they make OA via RADAR (e.g. exhibition images, accepted manuscript of a journal article). These licenses let potential users know how they can re-use it and if there are any restrictions.

The info-graphic below explains the different types of creative commons licenses you can attach to your work, ranging from the most free to most restrictive:

cc licenses infographic

 ©foter.   Licensed under CC-BY-SA

So why should you make your research open access and what are the benefits for you?

Making your outputs openly accessible in a repository, such as RADAR, enables your research to be disseminated quickly and widely making it more visible and discoverable to a diverse global audience.

It also leads to increased engagement with, and understanding of, your research by business, government, charities and the wider public which is good for impact!  As we mentioned in our last blog post you can check your download statistics in RADAR to see how much your work has been downloaded and the impact it is making.

Open access research also has a citation advantage. There have been a number of studies which have shown that research that is made open access is cited more than work which is stuck behind a pay wall. See: http://www.1science.com/oanumbr.html

Open access isn’t just for traditional publications such as journal articles and conference papers!

 RADAR has many images of artefacts and exhibitions available to view and download, which are often some of our most accessed items.

A recent report by the Smithsonian noted institutions that are making images of their art collections open access have increased the public’s engagement with their artworks, and their collaborations with corporate partners.[1]

By making your research outputs OA you will showcase the research being undertaken at the GSA which can lead to potential students and collaborators accessing and using your research.

Open access is also a public good.

Making your images and articles open access provides a good return on public money and can enrich the cultural and intellectual lives of those who do not usually have access to, or engage with, art and design research.  In particular, OA can help researchers in developing countries who do not have access to up to date high level research.

If you would like to make your research outputs OA, but have concerns about copyright, require further information, or are simply not sure how to upload to RADAR, please feel free to contact the RADAR team we would be delighted to help!

 

[1] Kapsalis, E. (2016) The Impact of Open Access on Galleries, Libraries, Museums, & Archives, Washington D.C.: Smithsonian, p.11.

Dawn Pike, Research Information Co-ordinator

August 2016