Open Access Theses in RADAR

To celebrate #thesisthursday for Open Access Week 2018 we thought we would look at the open access journey of our theses collection in RADAR.

Since 2014 the GSA has required all postgraduate research students to deposit a digital copy of their PhD or MPhil thesis in the institutional repository RADAR. Students can choose to make their thesis open access, embargoed or restricted from public view.

We currently have 131 thesis records in RADAR, 109 of these were completed at the GSA and you can browse the collection here: http://radar.gsa.ac.uk/view/theses/

How open is the collection?

How open is our theses collection

56 theses are open access*[1]

45 are metadata only

30 are restricted to repository staff only

Over the past few years we’ve been working in collaboration with our colleagues in GSA’s Learning Resources to make more of our pre-2014 theses open access. In 2017 we wrote to authors of theses with restricted files which were deposited in RADAR before our 2014 thesis policy was introduced. By the end of the project we were able to make 16 out of the 28 restricted records we had identified open access.

EThOS: a good news story!

In October 2016 GSA joined British Library’s e-thesis online service (EThOS).

EThOS is the UK’s national thesis service which aims to maximise the visibility and availability of the UK’s doctoral research theses.

Since joining we’ve noticed a dramatic increase in the number of downloads of GSA theses from RADAR! Before we joined EThOS our average monthly downloads of Theses were 46, since we joined in October 2016 we’ve seen our average monthly downloads increase to 312.

You can see the steady increase of our theses downloads in the chart below:

RADAR theses downloads
RADAR theses download statistics, source: IRUS UK

Our total number of theses downloads from RADAR is 9836.

Below you can see an infographic showing the top 5 downloaded theses from RADAR:

Top 5 downloaded theses

You can access the theses listed above with the links below:

  1. Al Shueili, Khalfan (2015) Towards a sustainable urban future in Oman: problem and process analysis (Muscat as a case study).
  2. Watterson, Alice (2014) Engaging with the Visual: Re-Thinking Interpretive Archaeological Visualisation
  3. Rutherford, Henry Roan (1996) Public sector housing in Scotland.
  4. Fung, Janice (2008) The unintended negative consequences of decision-making in Glasgow’s social housing sector.
  5. Gracie, David (2015) Subversive Art as place, identity and bohemia: The San Francisco Bay area 1945-1965.

If you’re a former PhD student and interested in making your PhD open access on RADAR please get in touch – we would love to hear from you!

Dawn Pike

October 2018

 

 

 

[1] *At least one file attached is openly available.

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New year’s resolutions for RADAR

Depending on when you read this blog post, we’re either in the run-up to Christmas, or headed into a new year – so it seems appropriate to bill the 2017/18 RADAR roadmap as a set of resolutions. Strictly speaking though, we’re already well underway with some of our plans!

The RADAR roadmap for 2017/18 sees a mix of new and ongoing developments for the GSA’s research outputs repository, ranging from new output types and refreshed help screens, and clearer information on licensing and open access options, to a Vimeo plug-in, and improvements to the ARP template (plus enhanced features for ARP peer reviewers).  And given the changes and additions to GSA’s Schools, these will be reflected in RADAR too, improving the experience both for GSA researchers depositing their outputs, and for users browsing and searching for content.

The headline priorities and tasks for the RADAR team are set out under themes such as Communication, Metadata, Reporting and Documentation, which also allow for flexibility, should any new and significant requirements and opportunities arise.

ORCIDs [1] may present one such opportunity.  With some GSA researchers already signed up for these digital identifiers (which help to identify individuals, and enable transparent and trustworthy connections between researchers and their contributions), and with systems such as JeS [2] now asking for ORCIDs as part of their grant submission process, we will be exploring ways that RADAR can expose these identifiers, and  thereby highlight researchers and their work still further.

The 2017/18 RADAR roadmap was considered by the GSA’s Research and Enterprise Committee last month, and we will be updating REC on developments over the course of the current academic year.  The roadmap is available on request from the RADAR team (details below); look out for news and updates via the RADAR blog and the Research Office Campaign Monitor too.

As ever, please get in touch if you have any comments or questions about RADAR; for now, we hope you have a relaxing festive season, and a happy new year – with all good wishes from the RADAR team.

radar@gsa.ac.uk

 

19.12.17

[1] https://orcid.org/

[2] https://je-s.rcuk.ac.uk/JeS2WebLoginSite/Login.aspx

New guides available in RADAR

Over the past few months we have added new guides to our ‘Help and Contact’ pages on RADAR and we thought we would let you know what’s new!

Our first new guide was highly requested by RADAR users and explains ‘How to export a list of your citations from RADAR’. It can be accessed here:

http://radar.gsa.ac.uk/5497/

This guide provides step by step instructions on how to export a list of citations from RADAR in several different formats, such as HTML and RIS (Research Information System) which enables you to export your citations into reference management software such as Endnote and Refworks.

We understand that re-entering information you have already provided elsewhere can be frustrating, so we have also provided information in this guide on how to bulk upload a list of publications you already have in RADAR to ResearchGate.  It should be noted, however, that using sites such as ResearchGate is voluntary and you should still deposit your research outputs in RADAR.

If you are a new member of staff and want to transfer your publications from your old institution’s repository to RADAR then please contact the RADAR team (radar@gsa.ac.uk) who can help you do this.

What else is new?

We have also created a set of Open Access FAQs which can be accessed here:

http://radar.gsa.ac.uk/5578/

This set of FAQs will be useful to those who are completely new to Open Access (OA), as well as those who already have knowledge of it. The second half of the FAQs will be of particular interest if you have questions about the OA policy for the next REF.  The FAQs cover queries such as “What is OA?” and “What does the REF OA policy mean for me?” and explains what you need to do to ensure your research is REF eligible.

If there are any questions on open access that we haven’t answered please send us an email (radar@gsa.ac.uk) – we would be happy to help!

 

Dawn Pike

November 2017

 

A new home for RADAR, Open Access and RDM guides and information

Over the summer the RADAR team have been busy updating the Research and Knowledge Exchange section of the GSA’s VLE with a range of information about RADAR, Open Access (OA) and Research Data Management (RDM).

To access these new sections, GSA staff can log on to https://vle.gsa.ac.uk/  and then select the Research & Knowledge Exchange community, which should be listed on the right of the homepage. In the image below you can see the three new sections we’ve added.

 

new-vle-jpg

Update your bookmarks, favourites, reading lists …

 A lot of the information that is now on the VLE used to be housed on the GSA Library webpages, but the RADAR FAQs, along with pages explaining Open Access and Research Data Management, have now been migrated to the VLE – so if you’ve bookmarked any of these web pages, please update them to the VLE.

The GSA Open Access and RDM policies can now be found in their respective VLE sections, and are also accessible from the Institutional Policies section of the GSA website, at the following link:  http://www.gsa.ac.uk/about-gsa/key-information/institutional-policies/

What’s new?      

The new sections of the VLE have enabled us to update our information and advice on RADAR, Open Access and Research Data Management, and we really hope you find it useful!

The RADAR section now brings together all the “How to…” guides you need to become a RADAR pro – they can be found under the ‘About RADAR’ section.   

We have a few new guides that you also might like to check out:

  • The ‘Adding dates to RADAR deposits’ guide explains why RADAR has now started prompting you for an ‘accepted date’ for conference papers and articles, and shows what information you need to supply, and why.
  • We also have a quick guide on ‘How to add a profile picture to RADAR’, which is a nice way to brighten up and personalise your RADAR profile page.

We have also added links to ‘Useful Resources’ that can help you make your work Open Access, and manage your research data – these can be found in the ‘What is Open Access?’  and ‘Research Data Management’ sections.

The RADAR Team are here to help!

The RADAR team hope these new sections on the VLE will provide you with useful information and tips on RADAR, OA and RDM, whenever you need it – but rest assured that the RADAR team are available to provide support and a friendly face if you need further information or assistance.

Dawn Pike, Research Information Co-ordinator

September 2016